Tuesday, January 03, 2012

Posted by Laurel Garver on Tuesday, January 03, 2012 20 comments
I hope you all are having a delightful Christmas. What? You're not still celebrating? Come on, the party doesn't wrap till Jan. 6, peeps. We're still in the heart of the Twelve Days, so whoop it up!

I was delighted (truthfully, shocked and awed) to receive a Kindle this season. In addition to some gift books, I've been loading up some free classics as well.

So far, what I have is the most ridiculous hodgepodge of eras and styles. I was an English major undergrad and also for a year of grad school, so I'd like to think I've ready pretty widely. But here are a few of the gaps I'm filling in.

Sister Carrie by Theodore Dreiser
Agnes Grey by Anne Bronte
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

I also hope to bone up on Jean Rhys, Djuna Barnes and some of the other 20th century women novelists. My modernist course covered mostly men; some, like Nathanael West, aren't particularly core figures either. Ah, sexist professors, how you warp us.

Anyway, I'm just loving how easy it is to have multiple books going at once. I can switch to the particular mood I'm in and not have to haul extra weight or lose my page. I think this will be particularly helpful in tackling the likes of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky, known for their hefty tomes. I think the backache factor has scared me off the Russians for years, but now I feel equipped to dive in. Yeah, I'm looking at you, War and Peace.

What new horizons could or has an e-reader opened for you?
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20 comments:

  1. I'm still doing the paper thing but today I got on the subway lugging a 900 page hardcover and really wished I had a Kindle! I'm really happy that you have an e-reader. Enjoy these classics. I hope you'll let us know what you thought and what you read :)

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  2. I did the same thing when I got my Kindle last year. I read Charles Lamb's essays, a couple of obscure Victorian novels, even started Moby Dick again. (Just because I haven't finished it yet doesn't mean I'm not going to finish it.)
    I'd say this is a definite plus of e-reader for me, especially since I live in a town with a library that doesn't have a lot of older works.

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  3. I'm so jealous! You're going to be reading a lot of great books. I'm still being a dinosaur and sticking to paper books but part of the reason is because I know I won't stop reading if I do get an e-reader. Enjoy everything!

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  4. I've read Anna Karenina and War and Peace, took both of them to the beach on separate occasions. Not good for the back but I definitely think it made me look smart. I happened to enjoy them, as well. :) I'm still averse to e-readers for myself but I'm happy you're enjoying it.

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  5. Merry (still) Christmas! ;)
    Hmm, that weight issue never occurred to me. I've only read Russian short stories, using the length as an excuse (though it didn't stop me reading Harry Potter...). I'd be interested to hear what you think of Anna Karenina--it's one I've wanted to read for a long time.

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  6. I love my Kindle too! The first classic (Canadian classic anyway) I downloaded was Anne of Green Gables. Loved it as much as I did originally! :)

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  7. Congrats on your Kindle! I downloaded and read the Complete Works of Shakespeare on mine.

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  8. I love finding trad. pubbed books that are marked down on promotionals. I love finding great indie and self pubbed books. And I love beta reading on my Kindle! I still read lots in print too though. Have fun with it!

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  9. Melissa: I thought I'd be reading paper forever. My in-laws surprised me big time! I discovered a new advantage yesterday--easier to read with gloves on while shivering on a train platform! No need to de-glove to turn pages, just press a button.

    Laura C: isn't it fun to discover stuff from older eras? Sorry about your lame library. I live in an urban area and our library LENDS e-books, which is pretty cool.

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  10. Saumya: It's not something I would've bought for myself, but I'm thankful for the gift! Hoping a loved one decides you need one, too! (Drop hints as necessary...) :-)

    Emma: I really enjoyed Brothers Karamozov and Resurrection (a lesser-know Tolstoy novel). I do wonder, though, if the freebies are not especially good translations. It might be worth shelling out a few bucks to tackle this part of my "reading bucket list." I love the idea of taking Russian tomes to the beach! Awesome.

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  11. Faith: Merriest of Christmas to you, too, fellow celebrater of the the 12 Days! The key to the Russians is a good translation. The stories tend to be big, lush family sagas, very gripping. I liked Brothers Karamozov a lot. I'd recommend it.

    Jemi: I read all the Anne books (and the Emily of New Moon ones too) as an adult. Montgomery had a great sense of mischief and imagination! What contemporary Canadians do your recommend?

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  12. Sandra: Annotated, I hope! Shakespeare can be wonderfully fun (once you get the lingo). I really love some of the Romances, like Cymbeline and The Winter's Tale.

    Laura P.: I am looking forward to taking advantage of all the bargains to be found! I've been slowly building up a wishlist to purchase from once holiday bills are paid.

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  13. I have two books going - one on my iPad and one paperback. I love the iPad and all the cheap or free delicious books out there! It's so easy though that it's scary...just click,click,click! But I love it!

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  14. I found that I read a larger variety of books classics, popular, etc. because they are a click away and reasonably priced.

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  15. I loved Agnes Grey!

    I got a few new releases on my Kindle for Mac when I was too lazy to go to the bookstore. Instant gratification is nothing to sneeze at.

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  16. I just downloaded Somerset Maugham for kindle for free. The kind of thing I feel like I should have read, but never did. It's a treat to have that kind of instant access to classics

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  17. April: It is hard to keep from going click crazy! As you say, there are so many inexpensive choices available!

    Holly: I think it will also be easier to get my hands on indie titles, many of which are only available as ebooks.

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  18. Lydia: good to hear. I loved her other novel, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall. She's the less famous Bronte, but imminently readable.

    Melissa: I'd love to hear what you think. I know Maughm is known for his tales of Westerners in Asia, but I don't think I've ready any of his work except maybe a short story or two.

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  19. I used to tell myself I would never get an e-reader. But now I kinda want one! Reading all those classics on there sounds wonderful. Have fun finding some fun buried treasures out there!

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  20. Abby: It's not something I would have bought for myself, but it sure does have its advantages. One of which is easier access to classics when my library is offering less and less shelf space to them.

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