Thursday, October 25, 2012

Posted by Laurel Garver on Thursday, October 25, 2012 8 comments
I'm over at Melissa Sarno's blog today, talking about a topic dear to my heart--"Let Setting Emerge from Character." I not only explain how I developed and researched settings for my novel, but also give some helpful tips on making setting and characterization support one another.

Why did I set the American portion of Never Gone in New York rather than Philadelphia? Is Ashmede, County Durham, UK a real place? Pop on over to learn the answers!

How important is setting in your work? 

8 comments:

  1. I think setting is hugely important, I've been blogging about on our weekly Thursday's Children bloghop. Not just geographical location, but houses too- dwellings shape characters as well as reflect them. Great post :)

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    1. Thanks, Rhiann. I agree there's an intimate connection between people and the places where they dwell.

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  2. Setting is essential for most stories. I wanted a small fishing town for my latest story, so I did a lot of research into the New England area before I decided where to let it be :)

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    1. That's good to hear. I connect so much more to stories that have a deep sense of place.

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  3. I like reading about how the environment (setting) affects the characters. Our own setting influence how we respond to the world.

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    1. Well said, Mary! It often isn't until we're out of our home setting that we see how much it has shaped our understanding of the world.

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  4. Setting is very important, and sometimes it's almost a character, but I do agree that character, plot, and even theme tend to determine our setting. And I always have floor plans for my characters' houses or other important buildings.

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    1. I agree that the theme and character can determine where we set our stories--like building sets for a play. And I love that you also work from floor plans! I find it helps so much with "blocking scenes" like in theater--so I know who is standing where and how they move from room to room.

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